The Lorne Scots Regiment


The Lorne Scots (Peel Dufferin & Halton Regiment)

 

Corporal Wiafe stands guard at the Brampton War Memorial

Master Corporal Wiafe stands guard at the Brampton War Memorial

The Lorne Scots is a reserve infantry regiment headquartered in Brampton, Ontario. The Regiment is divided into two rifle companies, Peel Company headquartered in Brampton at the Brampton Armouries and Halton Company headquartered in Georgetown at the Colonel John Roaf Barber Armouries with a detachment located at the Oakville Armouries; a support company, Dufferin Company, headquartered in Brampton with a transport section in Georgetown; a Pipes & Drums Band headquartered in Georgetown; and the Regimental Museum located at 48 John St in Brampton. The Regiment is one of Canada’s oldest military units, 14th in Order of Precedence of Infantry units in Canada, and a significant force contributor to the Canadian Armed Forces Operations around the globe.

As the Army’s primary war-fighters and the core of the combat arms team, infantry soldiers are responsible for closing with and destroying the enemy. Supported by the artillery, regiments of armour and the combat engineers, infantry soldiers are capable of operating anywhere in the world in any environment – arctic tundra, mountains, jungle or desert – and in any combination of arms, including airmobile and amphibious operations.

The Lorne Scots deployed a great number of units in the Second World War as headquarters defense and employment platoons, and since 1945 and have had many soldiers deploy as individual augmentees to overseas missions tasked with peacemaking, humanitarian & disaster assistance and combat operations in the Middle East, Golan Heights, Namibia, Cambodia, Cyprus, the Former YugoslaviaAfghanistan, Northern Canada, the Philippines and the Ukraine.

Army 101 Part One

Army 101 Part Two

Our History

 

Cap badge of the 234th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force

Cap badge of the 234th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force

The Lorne Scots have been an established institution in Peel, Dufferin and Halton Counties for nearly 150 years.

The Lorne Scots (Peel, Dufferin and Halton Regiment) originated in Brampton, Ontario on 14 September 1866, as the 36th “Peel Battalion of Infantry”. It was redesignated as the 36th Peel Regiment on 8 May 1900, as The Peel Regiment on 1 May 1920 and The Peel and Dufferin Regiment on 15 April 1923. On 15 December 1936, it was amalgamated with The Lorne Rifles (Scottish) and redesignated The Lorne Scots (Peel, Dufferin and Halton Regiment).

The Lorne Rifles (Scottish) originated in Milton, Ontario on 28 September 1866, as the 20th “Halton Battalion of Infantry”. It was redesignated the 20th “Halton” Battalion of Rifles on 12 January 1872, as the 20th Halton Battalion “Lorne Rifles” on 11 November 1881, as the 20th Halton Regiment “Lorne Rifles” on 8 May 1900, as the 20th Regiment, Halton Rifles on 1 December 1909, as The Halton Rifles on 1 May 1920 and The Lorne Rifles (Scottish) on 1 November 1931. On 15 December 1936, it was amalgamated with The Peel and Dufferin Regiment

Both units were Regiments of the Line. However, their Scottish heritage was sown with the Marquis of Lornes’ visit to the Toronto Garrision in 1879 with the 20th Halton Battalion attending the parade under LCol Allan. They formed a pipe band in 1881 and started wearing tartan trews and diced glengarries. The 20th Halton Rifles became the 20th Halton Battalion, Lorne Rifles. Many of today’s regimental traditions date back to this historic visit.

A number of officers and men from the 20th and 36th served in composite battalions during the Northwest Rebellion of 1885 and the South African War. During the First World War, regiments as such were not mobilized, but soldiers and formed groups of men were organized and placed in numbered battalions. The 36th Peel Battalion and the 20th Halton Rifles provided 16 officers and 404 other ranks to the 4th Battalion of the 1st Canadian Division. Subsequently, many more men from the two regiments were allotted to the 20th, 36th, 58th, 74th, 76th, and 81st Battalions. The 126th, 164th, and 234th Battalions were raised exclusively in Peel, Dufferin and Halton Counties.

Lorne Scots Cap Badge

Lorne Scots Cap Badge

In 1923, the 36th Peel Regiment was reorganized to become the Peel and Dufferin Regiment. Sir Robert Peel’s personal crest, the Demi Lion, was adopted as the Regimental crest. It remains the key centerpiece of today’s Lorne Scots cap badge. After becoming the Lorne Rifles in 1931, permission was granted from the senior duke of Scotland, The Duke of Argyll, to use his personal tartan and his ‘boar’s head’ crest. It can be seen in the unit’s collar badges today. On December 15, 1936, The Lorne Rifles and the Peel and Dufferin Regiments were amalgamated to form the present regiment, The Lorne Scots (Peel, Dufferin and Halton Regiment).

The Lorne Scots (Peel, Dufferin and Halton Regiment) perpetuates the 37th Battalion (Northern Ontario), CEF, the 74th Battalion, CEF, the 76th Battalion, CEF, the 126th Battalion (Peel), CEF, the 164th Battalion (Halton and Dufferin), CEF, and the 234th Battalion (Peel), CEF.

The Lorne Scots was one of the first regiments to be mobilized in the Second World War but never served as a cohesive regiment. Instead, members of the Regiment were organized into defence platoons and attached to various brigade, division and army headquarters.

Members of The Lorne Scots served in every theatre of war in which Canada fought with the exception of Hong Kong. A platoon of Lornes served with the Queen’s Own Rifles of Canada at the capture of Boulogne. Other platoons took part on the raid at Dieppe and landed on the beaches of Sicily. Since the war, the Regiment has participated at a variety of military functions. One highlight was the presentation of the colours by the Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario, The Honourable W. Earl Rowe, in the autumn of 1963.

The Regiment’s first ever colonel-in-chief, The Duke of Kent, visited the Regiment in 1979, 1983, and 1991. On his most recent visit, the unit was presented new Regimental and Queen’s Colours to commemorate the Regiment’s 125th birthday.

The Lorne Scots march through the streets of Toronto for the 100th Anniversary of the Battle of York in 2013

The Lorne Scots march through the streets of Toronto for the 100th Anniversary of the Battle of York in 2013

Today, the Regiment continues to serve its local community and Canada overseas. The Lorne Scots have gained a reputation for excellent marksmanship and some unit members have represented Canada at many shooting competitions such as the World Championships, the Olympics, the Pan-American Games and the Bisley Competition in England. Warrant Officer Larry Fish was one of the country’s best competitors won the Queens Medal for Champion Shot (Reserve) in 1967.

The Lorne Scots provided soldiers to assist Canadians during the 1997 Manitoba Floods and the 1998 Ice Storm in eastern Ontario. Overseas, the Regiment has provided troops to peacekeeping missions around the world, including operations in Cyprus, Cambodia, Croatia and Bosnia. Most recently, many Lornes have served with the International Security Assistance Force in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan, the Regiment contributed more than 20% of its authorized strength to the various Task Forces which served in Afghanistan between 2002 and 2014. The Regiment committed troops to Operation Nanook, a sovereignty operation to defend Canada’s North. The Regiment has also contributed to the DART Operation in the Philippines following the Typhoon in 2013.

The Lorne Scots stand out as one of only a handful of Regiments in the Canadian Army to wear a Hackle. The Primrose Hackle worn by the Lorne Scots was originally awarded to the Lancashire Fusiliers in the United Kingdom as a Battle Honour for their service to the Crown. In 1968, the Lancashire Fusiliers were to be amalgamated with the other Fusilier Regiments in England to become the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers and would lose the ability to wear the Hackle. Not willing to let the Hackle disappear forever, they gave the Primrose Hackle to the Lorne Scots in 1966 to wear “As a token of the regard and affection which had grown between the Regiments” between 1929 and 1966.

The Lorne Scots continue to live up to their motto: Air Son Ar Duthchais – “For Our Heritage”.

 

The Galley of Lorne Camp Flag of the Lorne Scots

The Galley of Lorne Camp Flag of the Lorne Scots

Fast Facts

Regimental Birthday

14 September 1866

 

Allied Regiment

Cap Badge of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

Since 1968 the Allied Regiment has been The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers headquartered at the Tower of London, London, England.

Formerly, the Regiment was allied with The Lancashire Fusiliers,  headquartered in Bury, England from 9 May 1929 until the Regiments amalgamation with the other Fusilier Regiments into the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers in 1968. Lord of the Rings author J.R.R. Tolkien served with the Lancashire Fusiliers between 1915 & 1916.

The Regiment was also allied with the Royal Ulster Rifles before their amalgamation with the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers and the Royal Irish Fusiliers into the Royal Irish Rangers in 1968. In 1942, the Canadian Army requested the alliance be discontinued to allow the Irish Fusiliers of Canada to take up the alliance.

 

The Queens Colour

The Queens Colour

Regimental Colours

 

The Colours of a military unit once marked the regiments position on the battlefield, now they serve more of a historical and ceremonial purpose, carrying the regiments Battle Honours and marks the units centre on the parade ground. The Colours are guarded by a Colour Guard typically made up of the units top soldiers.

The Regimental Colours were presented to the Regiment on 14 September 1991, the 125th Anniversary of the Regiment by the Colonel in Chief, Field Marshall, His Royal Highness, The Duke of Kent, KG, GCMG, GCVO, CD, ADC(P). The Colours rest in the Officers Mess when not on parade.

The previous stand of Colours rests outside Council Chambers in Brampton City Hall, and the previous stand to those rest in Christ Church in Brampton.

 

The Regimental Colour

The Regimental Colour

Battle Honours

 

In the list below, Battle Honours in capitals were awarded for participation in large operations and campaigns, while those in lowercase indicate honours granted for more specific battles. Battle Honours in Bold are emblazoned on the Regimental Colour.

The Great War
The Second World War
War In Afghanistan

 

Freedoms Awarded

The following cities have bestowed upon the Lorne Scots the honour of the Freedom of the City from their Council in Chambers:

City of Brampton (1969 & 1979)

County of Dufferin (1981)

Town of Oakville (1984)

Town of Halton Hills (1987)

City of Toronto (1998)

Communities of Dufferin County (2004)

Town of Milton (2009)

City of Mississauga (2014)

 

Colonel in Chief

Field Marshal, His Royal Highness Prince Edward, Duke of Kent KG, GCMG, GCVO, CD, ADC(P)

 

Honourary Colonel

Honourary Colonel Gary Reamey, MBA, BA, ICD.D

 

Honourary Lieutenant-Colonel

Honourary Lieutenant-Colonel William Adcock, OMM, CD
* William Adcock has also served as the Regimental Sergeant Major, Commanding Officer and Association President.

 

Commanding Officer

Lieutenant-Colonel Duane Hickson, CD

 

Regimental Sergeant Major

Chief Warrant Officer Alexander McKelvey, CD

 

Regimental Disposition

 

Cpls Banks and Smith hold the Galley of Lorne Pennant in Kandahar, Afghanistan

Cpls Banks and Smith hold the Galley of Lorne Scots Pennant in Kandahar, Afghanistan

Headquarters

2 Chapel St, Brampton, Ontario, L6W 2H1

(905) 451-5724 x7225

The Lorne Scots Official Page

The Lorne Scots Official Facebook Page

The Lorne Scots Information PDF

Peel Company

12 Chapel St, Brampton, Ontario, L6W 2H1

(905) 451-5724 x7238

Halton Company

91 Todd Rd, Halton Hills, Ontario, L7G 4R8

(905) 702-2260

and

90 Thomas St, Oakville, Ontario, L6J 3A6

(905) 844-0604

Dufferin Company

Sgt Taylor and MCpl Turner show a group of Afghan children the Galley of Lorne

Sgt Taylor and MCpl Turner show a group of Afghan children the Galley of Lorne

2 Chapel St, Brampton, Ontario, L6W 2H1

(905) 451-5724 x7233

Pipes & Drums Band

91 Todd Rd, Halton Hills, Ontario, L7G 4R8

Website

Email

Regimental Museum

48 John St, Brampton, Ontario, L6W 2H1

Website

Regimental Association

2 Chapel St, Brampton, Ontario, L6W 2H1

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